Customer Service - SportSpecificSizing - Running and Track Sizing Help, Tips & Information | Eastbay

Customer Service
Running and Track Sizing Help, Tips & Information

    Proper Fit (Shoes)

    Toe Area: Allow .25" to .5" (thumbnails length) of space between end of longest toe or largest foot and the end of the shoe.

    Width Area: Foot is supposed to fit comfortably without stretching the upper over the midsole of the shoe.

    Heel Area: Heel can move but is not suppose to slip.

    Choosing Running Shoes

    How to Determine Your Foot Type: The Footprint Test
    To figure out what type of running shoes you should buy, you first need to know what type of feet you have:
    1. Pour water into a pan. Just enough to get the bottom of your foot wet.
    2. Place one foot into the pan of water.
    3. Step on a piece of paper to leave your footprint.

    Types of Arches

    Normal Arch: Runners with a normal arch will leave a footprint that has a flare, but shows the forefoot and heel conneceted by a broadband. A normal foot lands on the outside of the heel and rolls inward slightly to absorb shock. This is the foot of a runner who is biomechanically efficient (normal pronation). These runners should look for cushioned running shoes or stability running shoes with moderate control features.

    Low Arch: Runners with a low arch will either see most of their footprint or almost all of their footprint. As with the normal pronation sequence, the outside of the heel makes the initial ground contact. However, the foot rows inward at a greater degree (overpronation). Runners who are mild overpronators (see most of their footprint) should look for stability running shoes. Runners who are severe overpronators (see almost all of their footprint) should look for motion control running shoes.

    High Arch: Runners with a high arch will notice a high and definite arch on their footprint. The forefoot and heel are connected by a narrow band. As with the normal pronation sequence, the outside of the heel makes the initial ground contact. However, the foot rows outward (underpronation) Runners who are underpronators should look for cushioned running shoes; as they will provide the most cushioning for absorbing shock and have enough flexibility to encourage proper foot motion.

    For more information please go to the Athlete Resource Center home page